2nd Armored Division – WW-2

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The 2nd Armored Division was formed at Fort Benning, Georgia on Jul 15, 1940, by reorganizing and redesignating the Provisional Tank Brigade composed of the 66th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks), the 67th Infantry Regiment (Medium Tanks), and the 68th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks)). It was originally commanded by Gen Charles L. Scott, with Col George S. Patton in charge of the training. Scott was promoted to command the I Armored Corps in Nov of that year which put Patton, now a brigadier general, in command of the division. The 2-AD participated then in the VII Corps Tennessee Maneuvers Jun 2/28, 1941, then moved to Ragley, Louisiana, on Aug 12, 1941, to participate in the 2nd and 3rd Army Louisiana Maneuvers. The 2-AD returned to Fort Benning Georgia on Sep 29, 1941, and participated (Nov 2, 1941), in the 1st Army Carolina Maneuvers, then returned to Fort Benning on Dec 2. In Feb 1942, the 2-AD passed over to the command of Gen Willis D. Crittenberger and was relocated to Monroe, North Carolina on Jul 10, for the II Armored Corps Carolina Maneuvers then was transferred to Fort Bragg, North Carolina on Aug 15 1942.

The 2-AD staged at Fort Dix, New Jersey, and moved, on Nov 3, 1942, to the New York Port of Embarkation (POE) for oversea crossing preparation. Elements of the division were among the first US military to engage in offensive ground combat operations in the European and Mediterranean theater during World War II. The 2-AD, now commanded by Gen Ernest N. Harmon, served in North Africa along with the 1-AD. They were part of the Western Task Force during Operation Torch, which landed at Casablanca in French Morocco on Nov 8, 1942. The remainder of Torch’s American component was the 1-ID, the 3-ID, the 9-ID and the 34-ID. However, the 2-AD did not see much action in North Africa and instead remained in French North Africa on garrison and training duties. In Apr 1943, Gen Harmon relinquished command of the division to Gen Hugh Joseph Gaffey. Training in amphibious operations began in preparation for an amphibious landing at Sicily.
As the reserve force of the Western Task Force of Operation Husky (codename Sicily invasion), the division landed on Jul 10, 1943, in support of the 1-ID during the Battle of Gela. Afterward, the division next went into action in the second landing at Licata, Sicily on Jul 21 following the 3-ID’s better-known earlier landing on Jul 10. The 2-AD, operating closely with the troopers of the 82-A/B, then fought through to the Sicilian capital of Palermo. Along the way, the 2-AD captured thousands of Italians. The fighting in Sicily came to an end on Aug 17, with the 2-AD having sustained relatively light casualties in the brief campaign, where it had gained its first Medal of Honor of World War II, belonging to Sgt Gerry H. Kisters.
Soon afterward the 2-AD was sent to England, in preparation for the Allied invasion of Normandy, and remained there until Jun 1944. In April the division received a new commander, Gen Edward H. Brooks, a decorated veteran of World War I.

The 2-AD landed in Normandy, on Omaha Beach on D+3, Jun 9, 1944, and operated in the Cotentin Peninsula and later formed the right flank of the Operation Cobra assault. The division encircled the 2.SS-Panzer-Division ‘Das Reich’ and the 17.SS-Panzergrenadier Division ‘Götz von Berlichingen’. During the confrontation, the Das Reich Panzer Division and the Götz von Berlichingen Panzergrenadier Division lost most of their armored equipment. Two columns of the 2.SS-Panzer-Division were mauled by the 2-AD. Over the course of two hours, the American artillery fired over 700 rounds into the enemy column causing destroying more than 260 combat vehicles while 1150 German soldiers were killed during the confrontation. The Germans also lost an additional 96 armored combat vehicles and trucks. The 2-AD alone was credited with the score of 64 German tanks and 538 other German combat vehicles destroyed during Operation Cobra while the division suffered 49 tank losses. Also credited with the score of over 7370 casualties in the enemy forces, the 2-AD suffered 914 casualties.

The 2-AD blunted then, the German attack on Avranches, then raced across France with the rest of Patton’s 3-A, reaching the Albert Canal in Liège, Belgium, on Sep 8. It crossed the German border near Sittard, Holland, on Sep 18, to take up defensive positions near Geilenkirchen, Germany. On Oct 3, the 2-AD now commanded again by Gen Ernest Harmon, launched an attack on the Siegfried Line from Marienberg, broke through, crossed the Wurm River and seized Puffendorf on Nov 16, and Barmen on Nov 28.
The 2-AD was holding positions on the Roer when it was ordered to help contain the German Ardennes offensive. The division fought in eastern Belgium, blunting Manteufell 5.Panzer-Army’s penetration of American lines. The division helped reduce the Bulge in January, fighting in the Ardennes forest in deep snow, and cleared the area from Houffalize to the Ourthe River.

The 2.Panzer-Division was on its original mission to the Meuse River. Mechanized units of this Division ultimately ran out of fuel at Celles, Belgium, where they were destroyed by the 2-AD and the British 29-AB.

After a rest in February, the division, now commanded by Gen Isaac D. White, drove on across the Rhine River on Mar 27, 1945, and was the first American division to reach the Elbe River at Schonebeck on Apr 11. It was halted on the Elbe on Apr 20, on orders. In July the division entered Berlin, becoming the first American unit to enter the German capital city. During World War II, the 2nd Armored Division took 94.151 POWs, liberated 22.538 Allied POWs, shot down or damaged on the ground 266 enemy aircraft, and destroyed or captured uncountable thousands of enemy tanks and other equipment and supplies.

Members of the Division received 9369 individual awards, including two Medals of Honor, twenty-three Distinguished Service Crosses, and 2302 Silver Stars as well as nearly 6000 Purple Hearts; among those receiving the Silver Star were Edward H. Brooks, Hugh Armagio, Stan Aniol, John J. Henry, William L. Giblin, Neil J. Garrison, Morton Eustis, son of William Corcoran Eustis, and Kenneth J. White. The division was twice cited by the Belgian government and division soldiers for the next 50 years wore the fourragère of the Belgian Croix de Guerre.

2-AD Casualties Killed in Action, 1102; Wounded in Action, 5331; Missing in Action, 253; Captured, 65; Battle Casualties, 6751; Non-Battle Casualties, 7116; Total Casualties, 13867

2-AD Awards DCS, 23; Legion of Merit, 13; Silver Star Medal, 2302; Soldiers Medal, 131; Bronze Star Medal, 5331; Air Medal, 342; Purple Heart, 5991. POWs Taken : 76963.

2-AD Command & Staff

Commanding General
Maj Gen Hugh J. Gaffey 24 Nov 1943 – 18 Mar 1944
Maj Gen Edward H. Brooks 18 Mar 1944 – 12 Sep 1944
Maj Gen Ernest N. Harmon 12 Sep 1944 – 18 Jan 1945
Brig Gen Isaac D. White 18 Jan 1945 – 23 Mar 1945
Maj Gen Isaac D. White 23 Mar 1945 – Until the deactivation

Artillery Commander
Col Thomas A. Roberts Jr : 24 Nov 1943 – 5 Aug 1944
Lt Col Carl I. Hutton : 5 Aug 1944 – 2 Nov 1944
Col Carl I. Hutton : 2 Nov 1944 – Until the deactivation.

Chief of Staff
Col Redding F. Perry 24 Nov 1943 – 18 Mar 1944
Col Charles D. Pamer 18 Mar 1944 – 29 Sep 1944
Col Clayton J. Mansfield 29 Sep 1944 – 30 Dec 1944
Col Gustavus W. West 30 Dec 1944 – Until the deactivation.

Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1
Lt Col Harold M. Forde 24 Nov 1943 – 7 Oct 1944
Maj Calvin S. Hannum 7 Oct 1944 – 10 Jan 1945
Lt Col Calvin S. Hannum 10 Jan 1945 – Until the deactivation.

Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2
Lt Col Harold M. Forde 24 Nov 1943 – 27 Apr 1944
Lt Col Jesse M. Hawkins Jr 27 Apr 1944 – 9 Sep 1944
Maj Eugene A. Trahan 9 Sep 1944 – 16 Dec 1944
Lt Col Eugene A. Trahan 16 Dec 1944 – Until the deactivation.

Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3
Maj Lindsay C. Herkness Jr 24 Nov 1943 – 27 Dec 1943
Lt Col Russell W. Jenna 27 Dec 1943 – 23 Jan 1945
Lt Col Briard P. Johnson 23 Jan 1945 – 24 Apr 1945
Lt Col Jasper J. Wilson 24 Apr 1945 – Until the deactivation.

Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4
Lt Col Charles C. Peterson 19 Feb 1944 – 15 Dec 1944
Lt Col Lewis M. Flint 15 Dec 1944 – Until the deactivation.

Assistant Chief of Staff, G-5
Maj Marcel F.J. Brunow 19 Feb 1944 – 15 Jul 1944
Lt Col Marcel F.J. Brunow 15 Jul 1944 – 11 Dec 1944
Maj Byron L. Connell (Actg) 11 Dec 1944 – 26 Dec 1944
Lt Col Marcel F.J. Brunow 26 Dec 1944 – Until the deactivation.

Adjutant General
Lt Col Robert H. Shell 24 Nov 1943 – 19 Mar 1945
Maj Clem G. Hailey 19 Mar 1945 – 7 Apr 1945
Maj Robert F. Smith 7 Apr 1945 – Until the deactivation.

CCA Commander
Brig Gen Rose 24 Nov 1943 – 4 Aug 1944
Col John H. Collier 4 Aug 1944 – 12 Nov 1944
Brig Gen John H. Collier 12 Nov 1944 – Until the deactivation.

CCB Commander
Col Isaac D. White 24 Nov 1943 – 28 May 1944
Brig Gen Isaac D. White 28 May 1944 – 19 Jan 1945
Col Sidney R. Hinds 19 Jan 1945 – 21 Mar 1945
Brig Gen Sidney R. Hinds 21 Mar 1945 – Until the deactivation.

2-AD – Order of Battle 1944-1945

Headquarters Company
Service Company
Combat Command A
Combat Command B
Reserve Command
41st Armored Infantry Regiment
66th Armored Regiment
67th Armored Regiment
17th Armored Engineer Battalion
82nd Armored Reconnaissance Battalion
142d Armored Signal Company
2nd Armored Division Artillery
14th Armored Field Artillery Battalion
78th Armored Field Artillery Battalion
92nd Armored Field Artillery Battalion
2nd Armored Division Trains
2nd Ordnance Maintenance Battalion
Supply Battalion
48th Armored Medical Battalion
Military Police Platoon

Attachments to the 2nd Armored Division

Antiaircraft Artillery
195th AAA AW Bn (SP) : 11 Jun 1944 – till VE Day
Btrys C & D 129th AAA Gun Bn (Mbl) : 25 Jul 1944 – 30 Jul 1944
Btrys A & B 474th AAA AW Bn (SP) : 28 Jul 1944 – 31 Jul 1944

Armored
Sq B Br 1st Fife & Forfar Yeo (79-AD) Nov 15/24 1944
40th Tk Bn (7th Armd Div) 23 Nov 1944 – 24 Nov 1944
Sq B Br 1st Fife & Forfar Yeo (79-AD) 25 Dec 1944 – 18 Jan 1945
Elm 738th Tank Bn (Mine Exploder) 12 Jan 1945 – 17 Jan 1945
A Co 739th Tk Bn 27 Feb 1945 – 5 mar 1945

Cavalry
24th Cav Rcn Sq 25 Jul 1944 – 28 Jul 1944
113th Cav Rcn Sq 6 Aug 1944 – 15 Aug 1944
1st Plat 30th Rcn Tr (30th Div) 7 Aug 1944 – 12 Aug 1944
4th Cav Gp 23 Dec 1944 – 31 Dec 1944

Engineer
Co B 327th Engr C Bn (102d Div) 16 Nov 1944 – 25 Nov 1944
Co B 105th Engr C Bn (30th Div) 2 Apr 1945 – 16 Apr 1945

Field Artillery
65th Armd FA Bn 3 Jul 1944 – 8 Jul 1944
65th Armd FA Bn 13 Jul 1944 – 30 Sep 1944
62d Armd FA Bn 25 Jul 1944 – 22 Sep 1944
258th FA Bn (155 Gun) 6 Aug 1944 – 26 Aug 1944
258th FA Bn (155 Gun) 3 Oct 1944 – 30 Oct 1944
65th Armd FA Bn 5 Oct 1944 – 21 Dec 1944
62d Armd FA Bn 6 Oct 1944 – 25 Oct 1944
70th FA Bn (105 How) 25 Oct 1944 – 3 Nov 1944
557th FA Bn (155 Gun) 30 Oct 1944 – 8 Nov 1944
83d Armd FA Bn 4 Nov 1944 – 24 Nov 1944
380th FA Bn (102d Div) (105 How) 17 Nov 1944 – 25 Nov 1944
957th FA Bn (155 How) 22 Dec 1944 – 17 Jan 1945
87th Armd FA Bn 22 Dec 1944 – 19 Jan 1945
65th Armd FA Bn 5 Feb 1945 – 10 Mar 1945
696th Armd FA Bn 6 Feb 1945 – 10 Mar 1945
258th FA Gp 26 Feb 1945 – 5 Mar 1945
696th Armd FA Bn 26 Mar 1945 – 19 Apr 1945
258th FA Bn (155 Gun) 26 Mar 1945 – 19 Apr 1945
65th Armd FA Bn 27 Mar 1945 – 19 Apr 1945
113th FA Bn (30th Div) (155 How) 2 Apr 1945 – 5 Apr 1945
197th FA Bn (30th Div) (105 How) 2 Apr 1945 – 17 Apr 1945

Infantry
22d CT (4th Div) 21 Jul 1944 – 1 Aug 1944
44th FA Bn (4th Div) (105 How) 21 Jul 1944 – 1 Aug 1944
1st Plat Co C 4th Engr C Bn (4th Div) 21 Jul 1944 – 1 Aug 1944
2d Bn 119th Inf (30th Div) 2 Aug 1944 – 12 Aug 1944
3d Bn 119th Inf (30th Div) 3 Aug 1944 – 4 Aug 1944
3d Bn 120th Inf (30th Div) 9 Aug 1944 – 12 Aug 1944
3d Bn 8th Inf (4th Div) 11 Aug 1944 – 14 Aug 1944
99th Inf Bn (Non-Div) 15 Aug – 18 Sep 1944
3d Bn 116th Inf (29th Div) 4 Oct 1944 – 29 Oct 1944
2d Bn 116th Inf (29th Div) 8 Oct 1944 – 11 Oct 1944
405th Inf (102d Div) 26 Oct 1944 – 3 Nov 1944
1st Bn 405th Inf (102d Div) 3 Nov 1944 – 6 Nov 1944
406th Inf (-1st Bn) (102d Div) 6 Nov 1944 – 25 Nov 1944
1st Bn 406th Inf (102d Div) 9 Nov 1944 – 25 Nov 1944
2d Bn 119th Inf (30th Div) 11 Nov 1944 – 28 Nov 1944
335th CT (84th Div) 22 Nov 1944 – 24 Nov 1944
1st Bn 119th Inf (30th Div) 25 Nov 1944 – 3 Dec 1944
60th CT (9th Div) 22 Dec 1944 – 23 Dec 1944
2d Bn 291st Inf (75th Div) 25 Dec 1944 – 28 Dec 1944
1st 2d & 3d Bns 335th Inf (84th Div) 1 Jan 1945 – 10 Jan 1945
335th Inf (84th Div) 1 Jan 1945 – 11 Jan 1945
1st & 2d Bns 333d Inf (84th Div) 10 Jan 1945 – 17 Jan 1945
3d Bn 333d Inf (84th Div) 10 Jan 1945 – 17 Jan 1945
331st Inf (83d Div) 28 Feb 1945 – 1 Mar 1945
908th FA Bn (83d Div) (105 How) 28 Feb 1945 – 1 Mar 1945
Co C 308th Engr C Bn 28 Feb 1945 – 1 Mar 1945
379th Inf (95th Div) 1 Mar 1945 – 4 Mar 1945
377th Inf (95th Div) 29 Mar 1945 – 2 Apr 1945
119th Inf (30th Div) 2 Apr 1945 – 17 Apr 1945

Tank Destroyers
702d TD Bn (SP) 11 Jun 1944 – 21 Sep 1944
702d TD Bn (SP) 1 Oct 1944 – 7 Feb 1945
Co A 814th TD Bn (SP) 23 Nov 1944 – 24 Nov 1944
702d TD Bn (SP) 27 Feb 1945 – VE Day

2-AD – Detachments to

Armored
1st Bn 66th Armd Regt 101st Abn Div – 16 Jun 1944 – 28 Jun 1944
1st Bn 66th Armd Regt 83d Div – 28 Jun 1944 – 6 Jul 1944
CCA XIX Corps – 28 Jul 1944 – 16 Aug 1944
G Co 66th Armd Regt 113th Cav Gp – 22 Sep 1944 – 1 Oct 1944
3d Bn 66th Armd Regt 30th Div – 12 Oct 1944 – 22 Oct 1944
A Co 67th Armd Regt 7th Armd Gp – 18 Dec 1944 – 22 Dec 1944
CCB 3d Div – 26 Feb 1945 – 27 Feb 1945
CCR 83d Div – 14 Apr 1945 – 20 Apr 1945
3d Bn 67th Armd Regt 83d Div – 19 Apr 1945 – 30 Apr 1945

Cavalry
82d Armd Rcn Bn 4th Cav Gp – 19 Jan 1945 – 21 Jan 1945

Engineer
Co E 17th Armd Engr Bn 1153d Engr C Gp – 9 Mar 1945 – 31 Mar 1945

Field Artillery
78th Armd FA Bn 4th Cav Gp – 19 Jan 1945 – 21 Jan 1945
2d Armd Div Arty 30th Div – 7 Feb 1945 – 27 Feb 1945
2d Armd Div Arty 113th Cav Gp – 11 Mar 1945 – 26 Mar 1945

2-AD Assignments & Attachments to
Date (As.) — Corps (At.) — Army (As.) — Army Group (At.)
24 Nov 1943 – . – First – ETOUSA
27 Nov 1943 – VII – First – .
8 Feb 1944 – XIX – First – .
12 Jun 1944 – V – First – .
18 Jul 1944 – VII – First – .
2 Aug 1944 – XIX – First – 12th
7 Aug 1944 – VII – First – 12th
13 Aug 1944 – XIX – First – 12th
18 Aug 1944 – V – First – 12th
19 Aug 1944 – XIX – First – 12th
28 Aug 1944 – XV – First – 12th
29 Aug 1944 – XIX – First – 12th
22 Oct 1944 – XIX – Ninth – 12th
22 Dec 1944 – VII – First – 12th – Br 21st
18 Jan 1945 – VII – First – 12th – Br 21st
16 Feb 1945 – XIX – Ninth – 12th – Br 21st
4 Apr 1945 – XIX – Ninth – 12th – Br 21st
8 May 1945 – . – Ninth – 12th

2-AD – Command Posts Locations
1942
(no infos available on file for Torch and Tunisia)
(informations welcomed)
(same for Sicily)

1943
27 Nov – Tidworth – Wiltshire – England

1944
7 Jun – St-Laurent-sur-Mer – Calvados – France
10 Jun – La Mine – Calvados – France
2 Jul – St-Paul-du-Vernay (vic NW) – Calvados – France
18 Jul – La Mine – Calvados – France
24 Jul – Le Dezert – Manche – France
25 Jul – Pont Herbert (vic W) – Manche – France
26 Jul – Notre-Dame-de-Cenilly (vic SW) – Manche – France
3 Aug – Percy (vic S) – Manche – France
4 Aug – Courson (vic N) – Manche – France
7 Aug – Le Teilleul (1 Mi NE) – Manche – France
10 Aug – Barenton (2 Mi W) – Manche – France
18 Aug – Sees (1 mi S) – Orne – France
19 Aug – Longny-au-Perche (vic W) – Orne – France
20 Aug – Brezolles (vic N) – Eure-et-Loire – France
25 Aug – Le Neubourg (3 mi S) – Eure-et-Loire – France
27 Aug – Mantes-Gassicourt (4 mi W) – Eure-et-Loire – France
30 Aug – Magny-en-Vexin (vic N) – Seine-et-Oise – France
31 Aug – Beauvais (2 mi S) – Oise – France
1 Sep – Peronne (vic NW) – Somme – France
2 Sep – Rumes – Hainaut – Belgium
6 Sep – Archennes (vic W) – Brabant – Belgium
8 Sep – Louvain (vic SE) – Brabant – Belgium
9 Sep – Hasselt (4 mi W) – Limbourg – Belgium
16 Sep – Maastricht (2 mi NE) – Limburg – Neth
18 Sep – Schimmert – Limburg – Netherlands
19 Sep – Oirsbeek (1 mi SE) – Limburg – Netherlands
4 Oct – Nieuwenhagen – Limburg – Netherlands
9 Oct – Grotenrath – Rhineland – Germany
11 Oct – Waubach – Limburg – Netherlands
11 Nov – Ubach Palenberg (1/2 mi E) – Rhineland – Germany
17 Nov – Ubach Palenberg (1 mi SE) – Rhineland – Germany
24 Nov – Baesweiler (1/2 mi SE) – Rhineland – Germany
22 Dec – Havelange (2 mi S) – Namur – Belgium
25 Dec – Mohiville (1 mi W) – Namur – Namur
28 Dec – Leignon – Namur – Belgium
29 Dec – Mohiville (1 mi W) – Namur – Belgium

1945
2 Jan – Weris – (Prov) Luxembourg – Belgium
7 Jan – Fisenne – (Prov) Luxembourg – Belgium
11 Jan – Erpigny – (Prov) Luxembourg – Belgium
13 Jan – Odeigne – (Prov) Luxembourg – Belgium
14 Jan – St-Jean (Farm) – (Prov) Luxembourg – Belgium
20 Jan – Florze – (Prov) Liege – Belgium
3 Feb – Gulpen (1 mi W) – Limburg – Netherlands
24 Feb – Aachen (2 mi NW) – Rhineland – Germany
27 Feb – Mersch – Rhineland – Germany
28 Feb – Garzweiler – Rhineland – Germany
1 Mar – Glehn – Rhineland – Germany
2 Mar – Heide – Rhineland – Germany
3 Mar – Krefeld (4 mi S) – Rhineland – Germany
14 Mar – Schiefbahn – Rhineland – Germany
28 Mar – Bruckhausen – Westphalia – Germany
29 Mar – Altschermbeck – Westphalia – Germany
30 Mar – Hullern (1 mi E) – Westphalia – Germany
31 Mar – Walstedde – Westphalia – Germany
1 Apr – Stromberg – Westphalia – Germany
2 Apr – Schloss Holte – Westphalia – Germany
4 Apr – Lemgo – Westphalia – Germany
5 Apr – Schwobber – Hannover – Germany
7 Apr – Elze – Hannover – Germany
10 Apr – Soder – Hannover – Germany
11 Apr – Hornburg – Hannover – Germany
12 Apr – Klein Wanzleben – Hannover – Germany
13 Apr – Gross Ottersleben – Hannover – Germany
21 Apr – Wolfenbuttel – Hannover – Germany
22 Apr – Braunschweig – Forst Konigslutter – Germany

2-AD Combat Narrative

In North Africa, elements of the 66-AIR and 67-AIR landed at Mehdia, Fedala and Safi respectively on Nov 8 1942. CCB received the surrender of Mazagan on Nov 11, and later some elements fought at Beja, Tunisia.

In Sicily, the division entered combat as a whole during the invasion on Jul 10 1943. CCA assaulted Licata while the rest of the division landed east of Gela. CCB mopped up the Niscemi area while CCA advanced, and on Jul 15, the division assembled at Campobello and then followed the army advance to exploit breakthroughs. It was committed into action Jul 22, and rapidly drove to the outskirts of Palermo. The division was then sent to England and trained for the invasion in Normandy.
In France, the division landed on Jun 9, 1944, and initially employed to strengthen the Auville-sur-le-Vey Bridgehead. On Jul 26, the 2-AD attacked through 30-ID and took St Denis le Gast 2 days later, being then relieved in the Percy area on Jul 29. Tessy fell to CCA on Aug 1, and on Aug 7, the division was committed in stopping the German drive on Avranches. On Aug 14, CCA overran Domfort and a day later, the division attacked west of Dreux to cut the German forces off from the Seine River between Paris and Elbeuf. It reached Le Neubourg on Aug 23, and resumed the advance on Aug 30, reaching positions northwest of Cambrai by Sep 1.

In Belgium and in the Netherlands, CCA crossed the Albert Canal on Sep 13 and reached the Meuse River the next day as the German defenders withdrew. CCB crossed the Albert Canal at Meerseen Sep 15, but its bridgehead was subjected to heavy fire the following day and CCA continued the crossing at Valkenburg. The Germans were forced back to Sittard which was taken on Sep 18 as the division ignited a breakthrough and drove to Gangelt. Unfortunately, one strong German counter-attack restored the US lines back to the Departure Line on Sep 19. The division then took up defensive positions near Geilenkirchen in Germany.

In Germany, the division attacked on Oct 3 as it crossed the Wurm River at Marienberg to expand the 30-ID Bridgehead. CCB attacked from Ubach Palenberg the next day, suffering heavy tank losses, and CCA reinforced. CCB was stopped short of Geilenkirchen on Oct 6. The division fought through heavy combat at and Oidtweiler to attack the Aachen Gap at Wurselen starting Oct 13. On Nov 16, the division attacked and took Puffendorf on the outer ring of the Jülich defenses with CCB, which was counter-attacked the next day and CCA committed. Against strong opposition, CCB took Apweiler and held it against counter-attack on Nov 18/19. The division renewed its attacks in heavy rain on Nov 20 and CCA fought the Battle for Merzenhausen on Nov 22/27. CCA then took Barmen and reached the Roer River on Nov 28.

The division then assumed defensive positions along the Roer until released as a result of the German Ardennes counter-offensive, moving to the Durbuy – Marche area in Belgium during the period of Dec 20/24. Back in Belgium, CCA reached Buissonville Christmas Day, Dec 24, and CCB took Celles the next day and held it against several counter-attacks. The division cleared Humain against strong opposition and then was relieved in the Havelange area by the 83-ID, regrouping on Dec 28. The division attacked then Houffalize on Jan 3 and fought the Battle for Odeigne on Jan 4/6, reached the Ourthe River Jan 15, and occupied Houffalize Jan 16. The division then was relieved by the 4-Cav Group on Jan 19 and withdrew for rehabilitation.

Back to Germany, the division assembled across the Roer River on Feb 27 and attacked on Mar 1 across the Cologne Plain as it assaulted over the Nord Canal.

It concluded the offensive on Mar 4 as CCB took Verdingen on the Rhine. It crossed the Rhine River Mar 27 and relieved the 17-A/B on Mar 29. CCB then drove to Lippstadt where it made contact with the advancing 3-AD on Apr 1. The 2-AD commenced the Battle for the Teutoburger Wald Passes on Apr 2 and by Apr 5 CCA had reached and crossed the Weser River at Ohr and CCB at Grohnde. CCA advanced to take the bridge at Schulenberg over the Leine River intact the next day. After regrouping on Apr 7, the division renewed its offensive on Apr 10 as CCB took the Oker River bridge at Schladen. CCB then drove 57 miles to reach the Elbe River south of Magdeburg on Apr 11. CCA assaulted Magdeburg with the 30-ID on Apr 17/18. The division was moved to an occupation zone south of Braunschweig on Apr 20 and mopped up stragglers in Forst Konigslutter Apr 21/22. Hostilities ended officially on May 7 1945.

Burt, James M.
Rank, Captain.
Baker Co, 66-AIR, 2-AD.
Born, Hinsdale, Mass.
Entered Service, Lee, Mass.
G.O. Number 95, Issued 10/30/1945
Wurselen, Germany, Oct 13 1944.

Citation Capt James M. Burt was in command of Baker Co, 66-AIR on the western outskirts of Wurselen, Germany, on Oct 13 1944, when his organization participated in a coordinated infantry-tank attack destined to isolate the large German garrison which was tenaciously defending the city of Aachen. In the first day’s action, when infantrymen ran into murderous small-arms and mortar fire, Capt Burt dismounted from his tank about 200 yards to the rear and moved forward on foot beyond the infantry positions, where, as the enemy concentrated a tremendous volume of fire upon him, he calmly motioned his tanks into good firing positions.
As our attack gained momentum, he climbed aboard his tank and directed the action from the rear deck, exposed to hostile volleys which finally wounded him painfully in the face and neck. He maintained his dangerous post despite point-blank self-propelled gunfire until friendly artillery knocked out these enemy weapons, and then proceeded to the advanced infantry scouts’ positions to deploy his tanks for the defense of the gains which had been made. The next day, when the enemy counterattacked, he left cover and went 75 yards through heavy fire to assist the infantry battalion commander who was seriously wounded.
For the next 8 days, through rainy, miserable weather and under constant, heavy shelling, Capt Burt held the combined forces together, dominating and controlling the critical situation through the sheer force of his heroic example.

To direct artillery fire, on Oct 15, he took his tank 300 yards into the enemy lines, where he dismounted and remained for 1 hour giving accurate data to friendly gunners. Twice more that day he went into enemy territory under deadly fire on reconnaissance. In succeeding days he never faltered in his determination to defeat the strong German forces opposing him. Twice the tank in which he was riding was knocked out by enemy action, and each time he climbed aboard another vehicle and continued the fight. He took great risks to rescue wounded comrades and inflicted prodigious destruction on enemy personnel and materiel even though suffering from the wounds he received in the battle’s opening phase. Capt Burt’s intrepidity and disregard of personal safety were so complete that his own men and the infantry who attached themselves to him were inspired to overcome the wretched and extremely hazardous conditions which accompanied one of the most bitter local actions of the war. The victory achieved closed the Aachen gap.

Kisters, Gerry H.
2/Lt 2nd Armored Division.
Born, Salt Lake City, Utah.
Entered Service, Bloomington, Indiana.
G.O. Number 13, Issued, 02/18/1944.
Near Gagliano, Sicily, Jul 31 1943.

Citation On Jul 31 1943, near Gagliano, Sicily, a detachment of 1 officer and 9 EM, including Sgt Kisters, advancing ahead of the leading elements of US troops to fill a large crater in the only available vehicle route through Gagliano, was taken under fire by 2 enemy MGs. Sgt Kisters and the officer, unaided and in the face of intense small arms fire, advanced on the nearest MG emplacement and succeeded in capturing the gun and its crew of 4. Although the greater part of the remaining small arms fire was now directed on the captured MG position, Sgt Kisters voluntarily advanced alone toward the second MG emplacement. While creeping forward, he was struck 5 times by enemy bullets, receiving wounds in both legs and his right arm.

Despite the wounds, he continued to advance on the enemy and captured the second MG after killing 3 of its crew and forcing the fourth member to flee. The courage of this soldier and his unhesitating willingness to sacrifice his life, if necessary, served as an inspiration to the command.

Hulon B. Whittington
Rank, Sergeant, 41-AIR, 2-AD.
Born, July 9 1921, Bogalusa, Louisiana.
Entered Service Bastrop, Louisiana.
G.O. Number 32, Issued Apr 23 1945
Near Grimesnil, France, July 29 1944.

Citation For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. On the night of July 29 1944, near Grimesnil, France, during an enemy armored attack, Sgt Whittington, a squad leader, assumed command of his platoon when the platoon leader and platoon sergeant became missing in action. He reorganized the defense and, under fire, courageously crawled between gun positions to check the actions of his men. When the advancing enemy attempted to penetrate a roadblock, Sgt Whittington, completely disregarding intense enemy action, mounted a tank and by shouting through the turret, directed it into position to fire point-blank at the leading Mark V German tank. The destruction of this vehicle blocked all movement of the remaining enemy column consisting of over 100 vehicles of a Panzer unit. The blocked vehicles were then destroyed by hand grenades, bazooka, tank, and artillery fire and large numbers of enemy personnel were wiped out by a bold and resolute bayonet charge inspired by Sgt Whittington. When the medical aid man had become a casualty, Sgt Whittington personally administered first aid to his wounded men. The dynamic leadership, the inspiring example, and the dauntless courage of Sgt Whittington, above and beyond the call of duty, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

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