(Doc Snafu Info) Although it is justified to consider a battlefield as a place where belligerents participating in an armed conflict kill each other to the best of their ability, it should not be forgotten that a battlefield is above all the test bed for new combat techniques, new war machines and finally the development of instruments or equipment intended to facilitate one or other of the many so-called military activities. It should be noted that the American army was particularly well organized on the subject because, throughout the Second World War, a multitude of observers were sent as close as possible to the combatants in order to listen to the information that the soldiers gave after the fighting.

For example, we will remember the addition of pieces of Belgian-made Cointet AT Elements stolen by the Germans in 1940 and used in Normandy, cut and welded to the front of the M-4 Sherman in order to be able to tear off parts of the hedges during the Battle of the Bocage; also the M-1941 then M-1942 jump suits developed by (then Lt) Col William P. Yarborough for paratroopers; jump covers for weapons (Griswold Bag) carried in operation by the same paratroopers or the reinforcement of the cockpit of the Waco CJ4A Gliders (Griswold Nose), these are the two last elements having been designed, tested and finally developed by Col Griswold of the Army Ground Force. This list is obviously not exhaustive and I will mention in particular, the Grenades Adapter used to fire 60-MM Mortar shell with an M-1 30.06 Garand Rifle, as well as the Grenade WP M-15 at the base of which another Adapter for rifle grenades was welded with tin, thus making it possible to send these grenades further and higher.

This very short but interesting post will show you items developed in Camp Hale, Colorado to ease the evacuation of wounded soldiers in future rough terrains like the Apennines in Italy, a system that Dog Company or the 10th Mountain Division installed and used during the combats of 1944 and 1945.

Light Aerial Tramway M-2

LIGHT AERIAL TRAMWAY M-2

The Light Aerial Tramway M-2, September 21, 1944, Camp Hale, Colorado (10th Mountain Division). The transportation of ammunition, food, and water, the evacuation of wounded personnel, and the moving forward of artillery for mountain troops in terrain too rough for pack animals or men has long been a serious problem for mountain fighters. The Army recently offered to the public its solution to this problem here when the Camp Hale Test Branch of the Mountain and Winter Warfare section of the Army’s Engineer Board gave a demonstration of the recently perfected Light Aerial Tramway M-2. A close-up view of the twin tower construction, shows a car passing through. The towers are so built as to be quickly disassembled and moved to a new location.

EUCMH - Light Aerial Tramway M-2 (IM-002)

The Light Aerial Tramway M-2, September 21, 1944. Camp Hale, Colorado. The transportation of ammunition, food, and water, evacuation of wounded personnel, and the moving forward of artillery for mountain troops in terrain too rough for pack animals or men has long been a serious problem for mountain fighters. The army recently offered to the public its solution to this problem here when the Camp Hale Test Branch of the Mountain and Winter Welfare section of the Army’s Engineer Board gave a demonstration of the recently perfected Light Aerial Tramway M-2. The M-2 provides an ideal method for quickly evacuating wounded from high mountains. Shown here is a Stokes Litter, tied to the tram car and lowered to the base terminal.

(Doc Snafu) Note that the Stokes Litter was quickly replaced by a special stretcher made of heavy cotton (OD Drab) and reinforced with wooden slats. This stretcher made it possible to wrap the injured and four straps were used to hold the stretcher around the injured while the wooden slats allowed to give him a certain form of comfort. When I was dealing with US WW2 collectible material, I found some of these stretchers but they were all dated 1945, and collectors from the old continent don’t really like this date because they all think the war ended on December 31, 1944.

EUCMH - Light Aerial Tramway M-2 (IM-003)

Light Aerial Tramway M-2, September 21, 1944. Camp Hale, Colorado. The transportation of ammunition, food, and water, the evacuation of wounded personnel, and the moving forward of artillery for mountain troops in terrain too rough for pack animals or men has long been a serious problem for mountain fighters. The Army recently offered to the public its solution to this problem here when the Camp Hale Test Branch of the Mountain and Winter Warfare section of the Army’s Engineer Board gave a demonstration of the recently perfected Light Aerial Tramway M-2. Near the upper Terminal of the M-2, Medical Corpsmen are shown loading a Stokes litter and simulated casualty onto the cable car. Three thousand feet below, the ambulance waits to rush the wounded man to a base hospital.


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